Episcopal Diocese of Washington

Engaging a changing world with
an enduring faith in Jesus Christ

Bishop's Writings

Living a Called Life: Transforming Evil into Good

February 21, 2019

But I say to you that listen, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you.

 Luke 6:27-28

 

In 1962, as Dr. Martin Luther King was speaking in Birmingham Alabama, a white man jumped onto the stage and attacked him, repeatedly hitting him in the face. After the first punch, King dropped his hands to his side, refusing to defend himself.  Chaos ensued. Others intervened and forcibly removed the man, while King kept saying, “Don’t hurt him. We must pray for him.”

 For many who worked closely with the young civil rights leader, watching King’s response to his assailant forever changed them. They realized that for King non-violence was not simply a strategy, but a way of life so practiced that even his reflexes responded non-violently when violently attacked.

In this third reflection of a series, Living a Called Life, I invite you to consider the holy vocation of participating, through the grace and power of God, in the redemptive work of transforming evil into good. This is the difficult path of redemptive suffering. We do not choose this path, but it is thrust upon us whenever we are confronted with tragedy, trauma, injustice, or other painful circumstances we cannot control or fix on our own.

Sometimes, as a result of the good that results, we come to believe that God willed the evil in order for good to be realized. It’s an understandable response, and if you attend this Sunday, you’ll hear an example of it in the classic biblical story of Joseph and his brothers. (Genesis 37-50) After a long and winding path of suffering brought about by his brothers’ resentment, Joseph finds himself in a position to bring about extraordinary good. Joseph says to his brothers, “Do not be distressed because you sold me into slavery, for God sent me here before you to preserve life.” Later he will say even more directly, “Even though you intended to do harm to me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today. (Genesis 50:20)

I do not presume to understand the ways of God, and the challenge to reconcile belief in a loving God in the face of all that is truly evil in this world is real.  Many thoughtful people turn away from the idea of a loving God precisely because they cannot reconcile such belief with what they see and have experienced.

But this I know: it not necessary to believe that God causes evil or tragedy to experience the transforming power of God’s love through them, a love that does indeed bring good out of evil.

Such transforming love is offered to us through the grace of God and in relationship with Jesus, the one who came to show us the depth and breadth of God’s love. Daily I choose to believe, in the words of St. Paul, that nothing can separate us from the love of God in Christ. More than that: I believe that at times we are called to join with Christ in the acceptance of suffering, taking into our very being, so that in some small way we might participate in the mystery of resurrection--bringing life out of death, transforming evil into good.

Such a vocation requires practice in small things in order to be ready for the larger challenges when they come. Dr. King was practiced in non-violence, so that when he was called upon to embody non-violence, he no longer had to choose his response. The way of love had become his way of life.

As followers of Jesus, we do well to practice the disciplines of love, forgiveness, and generosity of spirit. Most of this practice takes place in the realm of smaller transgressions, and the acceptance of life’s imperfections. There may well come a time, however, and maybe that is now, when we are called to greater sacrifice. Rarely do we feel ready to accept and embrace the suffering that can be thrust upon us. But here we are and the choice is ours.

Only then do we know the true cost of such love, a cost that we cannot bear on our own. In a hauntingly beautiful and courageous sermon preached at Washington National Cathedral, syndicated columnist Michael Gerson described the heroic vocation of living with the insidious disease of clinical depression.

"Many, understandably, pray for a strength they do not possess.

But God’s promise is somewhat different:

That even when strength fails, there is perseverance.

And even when perseverance fails, there is hope.

And even when hope fails, there is love.

And love never fails."

We would never wish our suffering on others, nor must we believe that God willed the suffering to come. Yet there are gifts that come to us, costly gifts, but real nonetheless. When we accept this calling as our own, we experience deep communion with Christ and a love that will never let us go. For that, we can be eternally grateful, and confident in the redemptive power of love.  

 

The Path of Imperfection

February 14, 2019

But when Simon Peter saw the catch of fish, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, "Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!"  
Luke 5:8

Glennon Doyle, author of the best-selling book Love Warrior, began her public life in open acknowledgement of imperfection. Here is part of her story as told to radio journalist Krista Tippett.  

On Mother’s Day 2002, Doyle learned that she was pregnant. She decided to keep the baby and marry the father, whom she did not know well. That was also when she determined to get sober. As part of her recovery, she attended Alcoholics Anonymous meetings. She began to wonder, “Why is that we can only be this honest with one another in the little dark basements of churches one hour a week? What if we could be fully honest and real with each other in everyday life?”

Doyle started to get up early in the morning and write in the voice she heard herself speak at AA. Through Facebook, she gained a large national following. What came back to her from people all across the country was a collective admission that the work of keeping up appearances was exhausting. “Why is it,” she asks, “that we feel we must keep from each other the very things we are meant to carry with each other?”

Why indeed.

As part of a series on what it means to live a called life, today I explore the path of imperfection. For feelings of inadequacy--and their shadow emotion of shame--can greet us the moment we hear a call. “Woe is me, for I am lost,” the prophetic Isaiah laments as he felt summoned before God. “I am the least of the apostles,” writes Paul about his call to follow Jesus, “unfit to be an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God.” “Go away from me, Lord,” Simon Peter says to Jesus, “for I am a sinful man.” Yet it is precisely in that moment when we acknowledge our brokenness and our failings that we can lose whatever armor we’ve been carrying to keep others from seeing who we truly are.

Methodist pastor Adam Hamilton’s has just published a book about the disciple Simon Peter entitled Flawed but Faithful Disciple. In Scripture, Simon Peter is truly our companion on the path of imperfection. (Adam Hamilton, Simon Peter: Flawed but Faithful Disciple (Abingdon Press: Nashville, 2018).) He gave his heart to Jesus, but time and again, he would get things wrong, say the most inappropriate things, and fail spectacularly in his efforts to be faithful. Yet Jesus turns to Simon more than any other disciple, as if to say to all of us, “I do not expect perfection from you. Embrace the path of imperfection.”

What makes Simon’s example so compelling is his perseverance, a willingness to get up every time he falls, acknowledge his failings and accept Jesus’ forgiveness. Remember that he was the one who denied even knowing Jesus three times on the night of Jesus’ arrest. How could he ever forgive himself for abandoning his teacher and closest friend? Even then, after his resurrection Jesus seeks Simon out to make sure that he knows he is forgiven, and still called to be a witness to Jesus’ way of love in this world.

As my life has become more public, so have my failures. Some of my more painful and embarrassing mistakes have been unintentional; others, more painfully still, the result of that particularly dangerous form of blindness that accompanies certitude that I am right.

I am learning that acceptance is the first step on the path of imperfection, but only the first. The second step is to take responsibility for the impact of my mistakes and failings on other people. The third step is to apologize and to make amends. The step after that is to learn how I might avoid such mistakes in the future. In other words, when walking the path imperfection, we must move toward pain rather than away from it. It isn’t easy, but it is the path of forgiveness and hard-won wisdom.

Public failure is the price of a public life, to be accepted with humility and grace. We must all do our best, all the while knowing that as imperfect beings we have been called, and in imperfection we respond. There is freedom in that realization, appropriate humility, and wonder at the depth of God’s love and mercy.

It also is a clarion call of responsibility, propelling us forward to act and offer what we have, rather than hold back in embarrassment or shame. For every day God calls us to acts of courage and kindness, of intention and commitment. Every day God calls us to live with the audacious conviction that our lives and our actions matter. Nothing serves the forces of evil better than the hesitancy of those unwilling to fail. Yes, we are the imperfect vessels of God’s grace, not the grace itself. But without vessels, grace cannot be carried from one place or person to another.

May you walk with confidence on the path of imperfection and boldly offer something of the love, mercy, and forgiveness you have received to those you encounter along the way.
 

Living a Called Life: The Path of Imperfection

February 10, 2019

Once while Jesus was standing beside the lake of Gennesaret, and the crowd was pressing in on him to hear the word of God, he saw two boats there at the shore of the lake; the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, and asked him to put out a little way from the shore. Then he sat down and taught the crowds from the boat. When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, "Put out into the deep water and let down your nets for a catch." Simon answered, "Master, we have worked all night long but have caught nothing. Yet if you say so, I will let down the nets." When they had done this, they caught so many fish that their nets were beginning to break. So they signaled their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, "Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!" For he and all who were with him were amazed at the catch of fish that they had taken; and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. Then Jesus said to Simon, "Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people." When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him.
Luke 5:1-11

This sermon is the second in a series Living a Called Life. The theme of call rises from the Scripture stories we’re blessed to hear this month, stories that highlight this experience of feeling one’s life summoned either by external circumstance or by an internal, driving energy that all spiritual traditions attribute to the voice of God.

Last week, I reflected on the inner and external nature of call, how sometimes we are called to depth within ourselves or within an immediate circle of concern, and at other times we are called out, beyond our boundaries of comfort or knowledge, for the sake of adventure or service. These two calls are not in opposition to one another, but rather “in constant conversation,” to borrow a phrase from the poet David Whyte. We don’t really get to choose between them, for more often than not, one or the other is thrust upon us. Yet there is a choice, in that we can say no, that we can reject or resist the spiritual work required of us in a given moment of life; conversely, we can give ourselves wholeheartedly to what is before us, choosing to accept and embrace even those calls we would have done anything to avoid.

This week, inspired by the biblical texts we have just heard and that you have printed before you, I’d like to explore the path of imperfection that we invariably walk when living a called life. Feelings of inadequacy--and their shadow emotion of shame--can greet us the moment we hear a call. “Woe is me, I am lost.” The prophetic Isaiah laments as he felt summoned before God. “For I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips.” “I am the least of the apostles,” writes Paul about his call to follow Jesus, “unfit to be an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God.” “Go away from me, Lord,” says Simon Peter in the boat with Jesus, “for I am a sinful man.” Yet it’s that moment when we acknowledge our brokenness and our failings that we can lose whatever armor we’ve been carrying to keep others from seeing who we truly are.

This week I listened to Krista Tippett’s interview on her podcast On Being to a woman named Glennon Doyle, a best-selling author who began her public life with a blog she calls Momastery. Tippet begins the interview with this summary of Doyle’s life:

On Mother’s Day 2002, Doyle learns she’s pregnant and decides she is going to keep the baby and marry the father, whom she did not know well. She also realized that she needed to get sober. As part of her recovery she begins attending AA meetings. There she begins to wonder, “Why is that we can only be this honest with one another in the little dark basements of churches one hour a week?  What if we could be fully honest and real with each other in everyday life?” So she starts getting up early in the morning to write in the voice she heard herself speak at AA meetings. Through Facebook and social media, her writings spread. What comes back time and again, from people all across the country, is a collective admission that the work of keeping up appearances was exhausting. “Why is it,” she asks, “that we feel we must keep from each other the very things we are meant to carry with each other?”

The Methodist pastor and author Adam Hamilton’s has just published a book about the disciple Simon Peter entitled Flawed but Faithful Disciple. Simon Peter is truly our companion on the path of imperfection (Adam Hamilton, Simon Peter: Flawed but Faithful Disciple (Abingdon Press: Nashville, 2018)). From the beginning of his relationship with Jesus, Simon Peter felt himself to be unworthy even to be in Jesus’ presence. When Jesus instructs Simon to put his net down into the deep water even though they had been out all night and caught nothing, and the catch of fish is so large that his nets begins to tear, Simon realizes that he’s in the presence of someone holy. And he’s certain that if Jesus really knew what kind of man he was, he wouldn’t want anything to do with him. But Jesus did know him. He knew all about him. “Follow me,” he said, “from now on, you and I will be fishing for people.”

In that moment, Simon Peter gave his heart to Jesus, but he would never be a perfect disciple. He would be the one to get things wrong, say the most inappropriate things, try repeatedly to be faithful to Jesus and yet spectacularly fail. Still, Jesus turns to Simon Peter, more than any other disciple, as if to say, “I do not expect perfection from you. Embrace the path of imperfection.”

What makes Simon Peter’s example so compelling for us is his perseverance, his willingness to get up every time he falls, to acknowledge his failings and accept Jesus’ forgiveness, even after what was surely the most horrible failing of all, when he denies even knowing Jesus three times on the night of Jesus’ arrest. How could he ever forgive himself for that failure, for not being there for his teacher and closest friend in his hour of great need? Even then, Jesus seeks him out, after the resurrection, to make sure that Simon Peter knows that he is forgiven, and still called to be a witness to Jesus’ way of love in this world.

Like St. Paul after him, the one who had to forever live with the memory of persecuting followers of Jesus until he himself became one, Simon Peter came to know and accept himself as a faithful and flawed disciple--faithful, flawed, and forgiven, loved and called. “By the grace of God I am who I am,” St. Paul wrote to the Christians in Corinth, and surely Simon Peter could say the same. “And God’s grace toward me has not been in vain.” Like Isaiah before them, both would go on to live lives of noble and imperfect service.

A dear friend came to town this weekend, someone we’ve known for 25 years, whose children grew up alongside ours from kindergarten through high school. He knows a lot about my life story and I know a lot about his, and both our stories have their share of mistakes and regrets. We reflected on what we have learned through our mistakes; how we have grown through our failures. Now, as we watch our own children forge their way into adulthood, while as parents we would love nothing more than to spare them their own mistakes and failures, we know that wisdom and character are born of suffering, from falling down and getting back up, learning from mistakes and moving forward.

As we talked, I thought back to one of my early public failures as bishop. It was one of my first Christmas Eve services at Washington National Cathedral. The year before, I had preached a sermon that was very well received, which left me feeling rather anxious as Christmas came around again. Preaching on Christmas Eve at Washington National Cathedral for a preacher is a bit like being a field goal kicker at the Super Bowl. You have to do what you do every week, but in front of a much larger audience with seemingly higher stakes, or at least that’s how it feels inside. As much as I tried that year to find inspiration, nothing particularly inspiring came to me as the day drew nearer.  

But because deadlines are deadlines, and Christmas Eve invariably came, I cobbled something together and offered what I had. It was, at best, a mediocre sermon. To make things worse, I said something that several people in the congregation took to be overly critical and even hostile toward the current state of Israel. That wasn’t my intention, nor was what I said about the Israeli government central to the point of my sermon. But what I said was interpreted to be so strong a political statement on Christmas Eve that one person contacted the Washington Post in protest, and others wrote the very next day some of the most strongly worded critical letters I have ever received. I was completely caught off guard by this flurry of harsh critique for a sermon that I was already disappointed with, and it shook my confidence to the core.

Now as public mistakes go, this one wasn’t going to end my career, and trust me, I have made far worse mistakes in both my personal and professional life. But for several days I was truly devastated, not because some people didn’t like my sermon, but because I had rather thoughtlessly caused unnecessary pain for some on one the most hopeful and joyful nights in the Christian calendar. Somehow I had to find a way out of my sense of shame and embarrassment, and come to a place of peace with imperfection.

It occurred to me that accepting my mistakes and failure was only one step on the path of imperfection. The next step was to take responsibility for their impact on other people. And the next step was to apologize and make amends. The step after that was to learn how I might avoid such mistakes in the future. In other words, I realized that my task was to move toward the pain I was feeling rather than away from it.

So I decided to respond to every person that had written to me. I apologized for the ways my words had offended and offered to meet with them. To my astonishment, every person accepted my apology and my offer, and I spent the better part of a week in personal conversation with people who wanted me to hear their stories. By the end of the week, not only did I feel humbled by what I had learned, I felt forgiven, free, and yes, a bit wiser. My learning wasn’t that I should never risk offending people from the pulpit, but to be aware of the ways certain words and phrases can trigger a whole host of reactions, and that part of my job is to be mindful and to choose my words carefully.

I also realized that part of the cost of my vocation as a public speaker--just like a field goal kicker--is the inevitable experience of public embarrassment when the best of what I have to offer simply misses the mark. I needed to accept that with both grace and humility, or I would simply freeze every time I had to preach a sermon. I still have the responsibility of doing my best, all the while knowing that mine was a path of imperfection through which, as St. Paul writes so beautifully, the grace of God can shine through, making it infinitely clear to all involved that it comes from God.

So it is in imperfection that we are called, and in imperfection we respond. There is freedom in that realization, and appropriate humility and wonder at the depth of God’s love and mercy. It also is a clarion call of responsibility, propelling us forward to act, to give, to offer what we have, even as we know it will be insufficient, rather than hold back in embarrassment or shame. For every day we are called to acts of courage and kindness, of intention and commitment--to live by the audacious conviction that our lives and our actions matter, and they matter, in the words of my colleague Bishop Jake Owensby, “on an infinite and eternal scale.” Nothing serves the forces of evil in this better than the hesitancy of those unwilling to fail.

What is true for us as individuals is also true for us in community. So I encourage you, St. Augustine’s, to walk confidently on the path of imperfection to which you are called, willing to learn and grow together, knowing that by the grace of God you are who you are, and that grace calls you to love and follow Jesus in his way of love. Take to heart these words from St. Paul from his second letter to the church in Corinth:

Since it is by God’s mercy that we are engaged in this ministry, we do not lose heart. . . For we do not proclaim ourselves; we proclaim Jesus as Lord and ourselves as your servants for Jesus’ salke. For it is God who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge in the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. But we have this treasure in clay jars, so that it may be made clear that this extraordinary power belongs to God and does not come from us.

We are indeed the imperfect vessels of God’s grace, not the grace itself. But without vessels, grace cannot be carried from place to another, from one person to another. So walk on, you noble clay jars, on the path of imperfection, and offer something of the love, mercy, and forgiveness you have received to those you encounter along the way.

To Live a Called Life

February 07, 2019

The Lord said to me, “Do not say that I am only a boy,” for you shall go to all whom I send you, and you shall speak whatever I command you.”  
Jeremiah 1:7

The poet David Whyte tells the story of an old Irish monk standing alone at the edge of the monastic precinct, when he hears the church bell toll, calling him to prayer. He says to himself, “That is the most beautiful sound in the world.” For it is the call to depth, to dwell in the place of imagination and creativity where we discover our true self and the presence of God within us. But then the monk hears a blackbird calling from out in a field, and he says to himself, “That’s also the most beautiful sound in the world.” This is the call to adventure, to set out toward new horizons, to go out into world right now, as we are, and offer our gift. (David Whyte, as quoted in his talk, Compass Points: Directions for a Future Life, December 15, 2017.)

What the two experiences have in common is the call itself, the feeling that we’re being summoned, somehow, either by our life circumstances or an internal, driving energy that all spiritual traditions attribute to the voice of God. This sense of being called to something, or somewhere, is among the most powerful and persuasive of spiritual encounters.

To be called is a uniquely human experience, because of the element of choice. Even when it feels as if we have no choice, we can, in fact, choose to say no to the summons, or refuse to give our hearts to what our bodies are forced to accept. We can choose, in Old Testament scholar Walter Brueggemann’s haunting phrase, “to live an uncalled life,” with no reference point or sense of vocation whatsoever. Conversely, we can say yes, give our consent and whole-hearted engagement, even in response to a call we would have given anything to not to receive, and in so doing become fully alive.

In worship services this month, take note of the powerful theme of call in the Scripture texts. Each week we hear courageous stories of those who feel their lives summoned, called either by circumstance or explicitly by God for some holy purpose. Biblical characters practically leap off the page and speak to us, across time and culture, of that universal experience. Invariably--and this is what make their stories so compelling--there is almost resistance to the call, inwardly, or from others, or both.

Last week we heard the call of Jeremiah, the boy prophet God chose for a most difficult task, and of Jesus’ recognition, or perhaps, announcement to his hometown of his call as he read in synagogue from the prophet Isaiah. This week, we’ll hear Isaiah’s call, and that of Simon Peter, when Jesus invited him to leave his fishing boat and follow him. Later this month, we’ll hear the story of Joseph, sold into slavery by his brothers, only to find himself as a result in a position to save an entire nation from famine--and to forgive his brothers. The season of Epiphany ends with the story of Jesus on the mountain of his transfiguration, as he prepares himself to enter Jerusalem and meet his destiny there.

There is always some cost to the most significant of calls, with no guarantee of outcome when choosing to accept them. Indeed, it should serve as fair warning to recognize that most of our greatest heroes did not live to see the fruits of their dreams. But the outcome of a called life isn’t as noteworthy, as internally significant, as the call itself, and the willingness to trust where the call leads. You know that it’s real when you’re willing to face whatever outcome lies ahead, because you know that the path is yours. One of our sons is an artist, and as a theatre major in college he was often asked by the well-meaning adults his life if he had “a plan B,” should he not succeed in pursuing his dreams. He astonishing reply: “I don’t think of my life that way. I’ll follow this path wherever it takes me. When I need to make a change along the way, that will become my new Plan A.”

I cannot know how you sense your life calling you now, but I have no doubt that it is. May God will give you courage and strength to continue on whatever path is yours.  Sometimes it may seem as if the call you’re hearing is insignificant, or the wrong one, and I urge you not to heed that critical voice. Listen instead for the most beautiful sound in the world calling and cheering you on. Pray each day for the grace to accept the creative tension of the inward and outward call, the ways God is asking you to trust that you are called to your life, that only you can live. For the world would be unspeakably diminished without the gift of your called, and faithful, life.

Living a Called Life

February 03, 2019

The word of the Lord came to me saying, "Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations." Then I said, "Ah, Lord God! Truly I do not know how to speak, for I am only a boy." But the Lord said to me, "Do not say, 'I am only a boy'; for you shall go to all to whom I send you, and you shall speak whatever I command you, Do not be afraid of them, for I am with you to deliver you, says the Lord."Then the Lord put out his hand and touched my mouth; and the Lord said to me, "Now I have put my words in your mouth. See, today I appoint you over nations and over kingdoms, to pluck up and to pull down, to destroy and to overthrow, to build and to plant."
Jeremiah 1:4-10

In the synagogue at Nazareth, Jesus read from the book of the prophet Isaiah, and began to say, "Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing." All spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth. They said, "Is not this Joseph's son?" He said to them, "Doubtless you will quote to me this proverb, 'Doctor, cure yourself!' And you will say, 'Do here also in your hometown the things that we have heard you did at Capernaum.'" And he said, "Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet's hometown. But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon. There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian." When they heard this, all in the synagogue were filled with rage. They got up, drove him out of the town, and led him to the brow of the hill on which their town was built, so that they might hurl him off the cliff. But he passed through the midst of them and went on his way.
Luke 4:21-30

The poet David Whyte tells the story of an old Irish monk standing alone at the edge of the monastic precinct. When he hears the church bell toll, calling him to prayer, he says to himself, “That is the most beautiful sound in the world.” It is the call to go deep within oneself to experience God, to dwell in the place of imagination and creativity, where we discover our truest self and experience healing, and it is where God dwells within us. But then the monk hears a blackbird calling from out in a field, and he says to himself, “That’s also the most beautiful sound in the world.” This is the call to adventure, to set out toward new horizons, beyond ourselves and what we know; to go out into world right now, as we are, and offer our gift.   

David Whyte uses this image of one person between two calls to describe the creative tension of a human being truly alive. At our best, when we live most fully what it means to be human, we dwell in that space between the call to go deep within ourselves for healing, personal growth, creative expression, and divine encounter with God, and the call out toward new horizons and all the adventures that wait beyond our sight, to give of ourselves now in whatever way we can.

Whyte’s observation, and the core conviction of his own writing, is that as our lives unfold, these two calls are always in conversation. In some seasons of life, one of the two may present itself in a ways that demands full our attention. We’re thrust into new circumstances for which we can feel woefully unprepared, yet out we must go; or we are called back to ourselves by circumstances that are simply non-negotiable, at least for the time being. (David Whyte, as quoted in his talk, Compass Points: Directions for a Future Life, December 15, 2017.)

What the two experiences have in common is the call itself, the feeling that we’re being summoned, somehow, by our life circumstances or an internal, driving energy that spiritual traditions attribute to the voice of God. However it comes to us and wherever it directs, the sense of being called to something, or somewhere, is one of the most powerful and persuasive of spiritual encounters. It seems to be a uniquely human experience, precisely because of this element of choice. Even when it feels like we have no choice, we can, in fact, choose to say no to the summons, or refuse to give our hearts to it, even if our bodies have no choice. We can choose, in Old Testament scholar Walter Brueggemann’s haunting phrase, “to live an uncalled life,” with no reference point or sense of vocation whatsoever. Consigning others to live uncalled lives through the forces of injustice or oppression is among the greatest of evils; choosing it for oneself among the greatest human tragedies. Conversely, we can say yes, give our consent and whole-hearted engagement, even in response to a call we would have given anything to not to receive, and in so doing become fully alive.

The monk in David Whyte’s story speaks of the call of both the bell and the blackbird as the most beautiful sound in the world. Feeling oneself called can, indeed, be a beautifully affirming experience. It’s breathtaking to witness in another human being when the call is rooted in joy. Perhaps some of you remember a film from nearly 20 years ago that later became a Broadway musical, Billy Elliot. It tells the story of a boy growing up in a English coal mining town who discovers a love for ballet dancing. Against all kinds of resistance from his family, dance was clearly Billy’s call, both inwardly for his soul’s sake, and outwardly for the world. When an instructor asked him what it felt like when he danced, he said, “It’s like electricity going through me.” He went on to become one of London’s premier ballet dancers.

More often than not, the call arises from pain, for the sake of individual healing or societal transformation, and thus the choice to accept it for one’s life requires great courage. I spoke with a young woman recently who has experienced a fair amount of trauma in her life, both in early childhood, due to bad parenting, and then as a teenager when she was diagnosed with a life threatening illness that required major surgery and a permanent change in lifestyle. Thankfully, she recovered and has all her life ahead of her. She is a remarkable person--intelligent, insightful and kind. Right now she’s dealing with the emotional impact of her medical crisis. She’s seeing a therapist, which is good for her, but as a result, painful memories of her early childhood are also surfacing. All of this is making her angry. She’s 20 years old and she just wants to live a normal young adult life--go to school, spend time with her boyfriend, and do all the things other young adults do. Yet here she is, summoned now to go deep within herself, for the sake of healing and growth. She’s sorely tempted to ignore the call and forge ahead with life, but she’s wise enough, God bless her, to recognize that this is a sacred, necessary time.  

Contrast her experience with that of those who hear a call, right now, to go out beyond themselves and offer their gift, for the sake of someone else. Again, it’s often pain behind their passion, pain that helps them persevere in their efforts when met with societal indifference or outright resistance. Through my work in gun violence prevention, I’ve met several parents whose children were killed either in one of the mass shootings that briefly commands our collective attention or in one of the more common incidents of gun violence that take its daily toll in numbers that we, as a society, have chosen to accept or ignore. They feel woefully ill-equipped for the work of social change to which they now feel called; they would never have chosen such a path for themselves, but here they are, determined to honor their children’s lives by doing all they can to spare other children their same fate.

Throughout the Bible, there are countless stories of men, women, and young children who feel their lives summoned, called by either circumstance or explicitly by God for some holy purpose. Sometimes the call drives them first into a season of solitude and prayer, or a time of apprenticeship and preparation; other times the call thrusts them into action with little warning. These are the stories that resonate across time and culture; they practically jump off the page as we read them, for they describe that universal experience of being summoned by life, summoned by God. Invariably--and this is what make the stories so compelling--there is almost resistance to the call, inwardly, or from others, or both.

One such story is the call of the prophet Jeremiah. According to the biblical book that bears his name, Jeremiah was chosen by God at young age for an extremely difficult task. He was the one to speak God’s word to the people of Israel during the time of the nation’s destruction and the painful season of exile that was to follow. The words that God would give Jeremiah to speak over the course of his life were not easy receive, for God was not going to spare the people of Israel from the consequences of their choices and the suffering they would endure. Nor would Jeremiah be spared, for he would bear the brunt of the people’s resistance to God.

When Jeremiah first hears the call: “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you, and before you were born, I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations,” he wonders why God would call him to this task, given his age. “Truly I do not know how to speak,” he said, “for I am only a boy.” But God responded: “Do not doubt your call; you shall go where I send you and speak what I command you. I will be with you, and put the words in your mouth.” (Jeremiah 1:1-4) Throughout his life, Jeremiah would wonder for other reasons why God had summoned him to this work, but of the call itself he no longer doubted. He described it like a fire inside that he could not hold in. (20:9)

In the Gospel according to St. Luke, we are given a glimpse of Jesus’ sense of call, and how it affected those closest to him, in a story that tells of his homecoming. It takes place in the early stages of his public ministry, right after his baptism by John in the Jordan River and his time of temptation in the wilderness. He has been traveling through the villages near the Sea of Galilee, teaching and healing, and beginning to make a name for himself. Then he goes home to Nazareth. On the sabbath, Jesus attends synagogue worship and when the time comes for reading from Scripture, Jesus stands up and reads from the prophet Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because God has anointed me to bring good news to the poor, to give sight to the blind, to set free prisoners and the oppressed.” Then he said the most astonishing thing: “Today the scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.” In other words, the Spirit of the Lord is upon me.

His family and friends, those who had known him all his life and had a hand in raising him, were at first filled with awe and pride for their hometown boy. But then he went on to say things that apparently offended everyone, in essence, that no prophet was ever accepted in his hometown and he knew that he wouldn’t be either. As the story’s told, the people of Nazareth immediately about-faced and drove him out of town, attempting to throw him off a cliff! Whether the people of Nazareth changed their estimation of Jesus that quickly, or if this story is a foreshadowing of how Jesus would ultimately be treated, I can’t say. But the truth remains: for Jesus, as for Jeremiah, a fate of rejection awaited as a result of the life to which he was called.

Not every call leads to rejection, thankfully. Sometimes they lead us to joy and the fulfillment of our deepest desires. Yet there is always some cost to the most significant calls, with no guarantee of outcome when choosing to wholeheartedly accept them. Indeed, it should serve as fair warning to recognize that most of our greatest heroes did not live to see the fruits of their dreams. But the outcome of a called life isn’t as noteworthy, as internally significant, as the call itself, and the willingness to trust where the call leads. You know that it’s real when you’re willing to face whatever outcome lies ahead, because you know that the path is yours. One of our sons is an artist, and as a theatre major in college he was often asked by the well-meaning adults his life if he had “a plan B,” should he not succeed in pursuing his dreams. He astonishing reply: “I don’t think of my life that way. I’ll follow this path wherever it takes me. When I need to make a change along the way, that will become my new Plan A.”

I cannot know how you sense your life calling you now, but I have no doubt that it is. I have no doubt that God is at work in you, Jesus is walking with you, and the Spirit is all around you. My prayer today is that God will give you courage and strength to continue on whatever path is yours. Sometimes it may seem as if the call you’re hearing is insignificant, or the wrong one, and I urge you not to heed that critical voice. Listen instead for the most beautiful sound in the world calling and cheering you on.  

And I encourage you to pray each day for the grace to accept the creative tension of the inward and outward call, the ways God is asking you to trust that you are called to your life, the only you can live. For the world would be unspeakably diminished without the gift of you, fully alive.  

“The Bell and the Blackbird,” by David Whyte (in The Bell and the Blackbird: Poetry (Langley WA: Many Rivers Press, 2018, p.23-24)

The sound
of a bell
still reverberating,

or a blackbird
Calling
from a corner
of a
field.

Asking you
to wake
into this life
or inviting you
Deeper
to one that waits.

Either way
takes courage,
either way wants you
to be nothing
but that self that
is no self at all,
wants you to walk
to the place
where you find
you already know
how to give
every last thing
away.

The approach
That is also
The meeting
Itself,
Without any
Meeting
At all.

That radiance
You have always
Carried with you
As you walk
Both alone
And completely
Accompanied
In friendship
By every corner
Of the world
Crying
Allelujah.

secret